A New Life for the Old Main Post Office

Photo credit: Liz Chilsen

Photo credit: Liz Chilsen

Twenty-three years ago, the United States Postal Service shut down operations at the Old Main Post Office at 433 W. Van Burn Street in Chicago. The well-known Art Deco building sat vacant and neglected for years until the property was acquired by developer 601W Companies in 2016. Work to bring the building back to life began shortly thereafter. According to a recent story in Curbed Chicago, the plan to transform the 2.8 million-square-foot-building “is the nation’s single largest adaptive reuse project currently under construction.”

It was built in 1921 and expanded in 1934, and designed by one of Chicago’s best known architecture firms, Graham, Anderson, Probst and White. According to Landmarks Illinois, “the massive limestone façade is a mammoth example of the Classic Art Deco style, and the main lobby features lavish details like white marble and gold glass mosaics. Since purchasing the massive structure, 601W has worked with global architecture firm Gensler to restore the Art Deco icon to its former glory.”

In 1997, Landmarks Illinois had included the Old Main Post Office on their list of Most Endangered Historic Places in Illinois. After more than two decades of advocating for its reuse, Landmarks Illinois can point to the building as just one of many preservation success stories.